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SSL, or Secure Sockets Layer protocol, helps protect information that is exchanged between a server and a client.

For more information about what SSL is, see our Secure Server (SSL) Information article.

Possible Reason #1: SSL Certificate Not Installed

What is it?

An SSL certificate needs to be installed to enable SSL on a site.

Is it happening to me?

If you know you have an SSL certificate, but don’t remember doing an installation, this may be the reason your site is non-secure.

How to fix

To fix this problem, you need to install the SSL certificate. If you got your certificate through pair Networks, contact support and they will help you with the installation:

Possible Reason #2: SSL Enabled, But No Certificate

What is it?

An SSL certificate is required for SSL sites to be considered secure. There are server features to turn on SSL and servers that come with SSL enabled, but both still require an SSL certificate to be secure.

Is it happening to me?

If you haven’t purchased an SSL certificate, then this is the most likely the reason your site is non-secure.

How to fix

You will need to buy an SSL certificate in order to secure your website. You can get them from pair Networks here.

Possible Reason #3: Your SSL Certificate Expired

What is it?

SSL certificates are only good for so long. It can expire if it not renewed, which will cause the site to become non-secure.

Is it happening to me?

Usually, you will be prompted to renew your certificate before it expires. If you have been getting prompts, but haven’t renewed it yet, an expired certificate is probably the reason your site is not secure.

How to fix

If it’s not too long after the expiration date, you may be able to renew it. However, after a certain amount of time, the certificate becomes non-renewable. If this happens, you will have to buy a completely new SSL certificate.

Possible Reason #4: Non-Secure Links/Resources

What is it?

Non-secure links or resources can cause the page to be flagged as non-secure, even if it has an SSL certificate. Things you need to make sure are secure are: 

  • Images
  • Cascading style sheets (CSS)
  • Javascript

You can check to see if these things are secure by checking how they’re linked in your code. Secure external links begin with https, while non-secure links begin with http. Local content that uses a relative path will automatically adopt SSL when it is installed on a domain.

Is it happening to me?

If you are sure your SSL certificate is installed correctly and you know have one or more of the resources listed above, you should double-check their links. If you see that you have unsecured links, this is most likely the problem. 

How to fix

If you find any links that are http, you need to make them secure. 

To fix unsecured links, you need to make sure that your HTML code either calls locally hosted elements via a relative path, such as:

/images.logo.png

/includes/script.js

Or, if they’re called by their absolute path, you need to be sure the link includes the https.

https://mydomain.com/images/logo.png

https://mydomain.com/includes/script.js

Likewise, if you are using a CDN for resources on your website, you should check the CDN and make sure it is operating over SSL.